Non-Fiction

HYPER-PLURALITIES FOR A NEW BECOMING: THE EXHIBITED BODY IN CONTEMPORARY ART

01/16/2016
HYPER-PLURALITIES FOR A NEW BECOMING: THE EXHIBITED BODY IN CONTEMPORARY ART
Barkley L. Hendricks, 
Lawdy Mama, 1969
, Oil and gold leaf on canvas, 
53 3/4 x 36 1/4 in; 
The Studio Museum in Harlem, Gift of Stuart Liebman, in memory of Joseph B. Liebman, 83.25; © Barkley L. Hendricks; Photo: Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; Exhibited in Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties at the Blanton Museum of Art, Texa
The following article was originally published by Artslant on January 16, 2015. “The body is always a body that is an unfinished entity.” —Lisa Blackman, The Body (Key Concepts), Berg, 2008 “We have a whole history of representation in which the black body was not the privileged body,” Kerry James Marshall said in an interview a few years ago. “So there was no crisis of representation for me, because the black figure is underrepresented.” Marshall has patiently, and... +

LIFE IN THE ANTHROPOCENE: ENVIRONMENTAL EXHIBITIONS FOR THE HUMAN EPOCH

01/06/2016
The following article was originally published by Artslant on January 6, 2015. I go back and forth between feeling like Anthropocene is a buzzword for contemporary hysteria—our generation's equivalent to the Cold War—and recognizing it as a practical reality. Either way it is the nexus point between published facts and our dogged consumerist lifestyles: we live in the 6th Great... +

Hamburger Bahnhof // Finding Black Mountain: A Working Model For Sensible Members of Society

09/28/2015
Hamburger Bahnhof // Finding Black Mountain: A Working Model For Sensible Members of Society
Exhibition: “Black Mountain, An Interdisciplinary Experiment 1933-1957“ at the Hamburger Bahnhof—Museum für Gegenwart—Berlin. / Von links: Cy Twombly: Untitled, 1951. / Robert Rauschenberg: Pink Door, 1954. / © Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof, SMB / Thomas Bruns.
Hamburger Bahnhof // Finding Black Mountain: A Working Model For Sensible Members of Society
Exhibition: “Black Mountain, An Interdisciplinary Experiment 1933-1957“ at the Hamburger Bahnhof—Museum für Gegenwart—Berlin. Photo: Hazel Larsen Archer: Elizabeth Schmitt Jennerjahn und Robert Rauschenberg dancing, ca. 1948. / Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1951. / Robert Rauschenberg: Pink Door, 1954. / Robert Rauschenberg: Untitled (Black Painting), 1952. / © Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof, SMB / Thomas Bruns.
The following article was originally published by The Seen in September, 2015. The idea of Black Mountain College has baited my imagination since it first emerged into my experience—an accidental and auxiliary reference—from the otherwise vast sea of culture. The college came up periodically thereafter, breaching conversations as a peripheral point of reference, its significance intuited rather... +