Posts tagged "Reviews"

Slipping through the net of a metaphor: SITE SANTA FE // MUCH WIDER THAN A LINE

10/03/2016
Slipping through the net of a metaphor: SITE SANTA FE // MUCH WIDER THAN A LINE
Paolo Soleri (b. 1919, Turin, Italy; died 2013, Paradise Valley, AZ). Amphitheater, c. 1975. Commissioned by the Lloyd Kiva New for Institute of American Indian Arts, 1964. Image courtesy of the IAIA Archives, Santa Fe
Originally published by The Seen, Sept 2016. SITE Santa Fe stands close to the downtown historic district of the city, beside train tracks and Warehouse 21, a haven for artistic youth. Contextualized by a landscape that originally belonged (and still partially belongs) to Native Americans, within the architectural residue of a complex colonial and missionary histories, the Southwest... +

HYPER-PLURALITIES FOR A NEW BECOMING: THE EXHIBITED BODY IN CONTEMPORARY ART

01/16/2016
HYPER-PLURALITIES FOR A NEW BECOMING: THE EXHIBITED BODY IN CONTEMPORARY ART
Barkley L. Hendricks, 
Lawdy Mama, 1969
, Oil and gold leaf on canvas, 
53 3/4 x 36 1/4 in; 
The Studio Museum in Harlem, Gift of Stuart Liebman, in memory of Joseph B. Liebman, 83.25; © Barkley L. Hendricks; Photo: Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York; Exhibited in Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties at the Blanton Museum of Art, Texa
The following article was originally published by Artslant on January 16, 2015. “The body is always a body that is an unfinished entity.” —Lisa Blackman, The Body (Key Concepts), Berg, 2008 “We have a whole history of representation in which the black body was not the privileged body,” Kerry James Marshall said in an interview a few years ago. “So there was no crisis of representation for me, because the black figure is underrepresented.” Marshall has patiently, and... +

LIFE IN THE ANTHROPOCENE: ENVIRONMENTAL EXHIBITIONS FOR THE HUMAN EPOCH

01/06/2016
The following article was originally published by Artslant on January 6, 2015. I go back and forth between feeling like Anthropocene is a buzzword for contemporary hysteria—our generation's equivalent to the Cold War—and recognizing it as a practical reality. Either way it is the nexus point between published facts and our dogged consumerist lifestyles: we live in the 6th Great... +